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21Oct, 2019

Healthcare 2030 (Part 3)

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Healthcare 2030 (Part 3) Our last blog, Healthcare 2030 (Part 2), ended with the prediction of a new “golden age of healthcare.”  I realize it is impossible to predict a golden age before it has happened, however, in this case, we may have one exception. Once referred to as “The Maestro,” Allan Greenspan once said or wrote something like ‘demography is history.’  His premise was that if you have great demographic information, with historical perspective and behavior economics (my injection, not his), you could predict just about anything. A simple […]
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15Oct, 2019

Healthcare 2030 (Part 2)

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Healthcare 2030 (Part 2) In our last blog, Healthcare 2030 (Part 1), we ended with some rather bleak topics.  As a balance, we will discuss some really great news this week from a recent article in the U.S., “September unemployment rate falls to 3.5%, a 50-year low, as payrolls rise by 136,000.”[1] The news is very good for all of us living in the U.S., and potentially for many others who depend on the U.S. business activity, at a time when most of Western Europe, Japan, Korea and even China […]
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24Sep, 2019

Healthcare 2030 (Pt. 1)

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We have had an incredibly busy summer in South Florida. I would like to say that healthcare was also quiet however, it seems more activity, more stress and more desire to change the path of U.S. healthcare continues to grow each year. In our last blog, we warned that “Medicare for All” would make the U.S. Healthcare problem worse. Though we believe the U.S. healthcare delivery is not among the best, it has also become very frail, and it is becoming very concerning. In 1965, the U.S. was at the […]
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24Jul, 2019

Medicare’s 2026 Crisis (Part 2)

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We ended our previous blog discussing the problem the Medicare Trust Fund will be facing by 2026.  This time, we reflect on a few more problems, missed opportunities, and maybe what steps we need to take to change what looks to be inevitable.   In Medicare’s 2026 Crisis (Part 1), we noted that we have just witnessed a historic event.  For the first time in history, there are more people aged 65 and older than those aged 5 years and under, worldwide.  This fact has been so slow in impacting our […]
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2May, 2019

Medicare’s 2026 Crisis (Part 1)

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We ended our last blog with the promise we would discuss a historic event that will affect all of us for generations to come. For the first time in history, there are more people aged 65 and older than those aged 5 years and under, worldwide. This is a dynamic that is not generally factored into the healthcare discussion. To start this series of blogs, we will quote verbatim a report recently issued by Social Security and Medicare Boards of Trustees on the status of Medicare. The Medicare program helps […]
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23Apr, 2019

Medicare For All – The 2019 Version: Reality Check Part 5 (Final)

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For our closing blog in this series, we will be addressing the “Medicare for All” movement.  The sheer volume of material this topic offers would allow this conversation to continue for much longer; however, there are more urgent and potentially more transformative issues in healthcare that need to be examined, therefore this will conclude this series. In the months preceding and following the 2016 Presidential election, we wrote extensively on possible remedies or modernization to the healthcare industry in the United States; however, our view on healthcare never has been, […]
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28Feb, 2019

Medicare For All – The 2019 Version: Reality Check (Part 4)

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We strongly believe that healthcare costs cannot be resolved by a government takeover of healthcare without dramatic reduction of care, dramatic loss of well-paid employment, and without dramatic contraction in the national healthcare infrastructure of the United States.  Another possibility is regarding substantial increases in taxes to the U.S. economy, whether personal or corporate or both; however, that’s not my area of expertise. On February 23, 2019, at the U.S. House of Representatives, a bill was introduced as “Medicare For All Act of 2019” with 100 co-sponsors. At this pace, […]
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8Feb, 2019

Medicare For All – The 2019 Version: Reality Check (Part 3)

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In our last few blogs, we have set the stage for a deeper conversation on Medicare For All (MFA).  We have looked at some of the macro and micro numbers, and there is a bit more to explore.  In our upcoming blogs, we will dive further into potential costs and ways to pay for MFA, as well as suggest some real tangible ideas on three “must do” items: Expand healthcare coverage to those not covered today Lower the cost of care Improve healthcare for our society The fact is, anyone […]
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4Feb, 2019

Medicare For All – The 2019 Version: Reality Check (Part 2)

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In our last blog, we started to frame the issue and disclose the undisputable numbers regarding how much healthcare costs, how many are insured/uninsured, and what the per-capita cost for healthcare is in the United States.  Additionally, we talked about how attractive the idea is just to extend Medicare to all Americans. Well, some could say that maybe it means that Medicare will be only extended to the uninsured.  It is a reasonable idea to insure the 28.5 million uninsured Americans.  How many companies will just drop insurance if that […]
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24Jan, 2019

Medicare For All – The 2019 Version: Reality Check (Part 1)

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First and foremost, happy new year! I have taken a break from writing these blogs for several reasons.  One, I have been super busy with new projects.  Two, I needed a break to get a wider perspective after the U.S. midterm elections.  Lastly, I needed to figure out how to address this new wave of healthcare reform called “Medicare For All” (MFA). First, I will admit that I have some internal conflicts.  In my earlier life in this profession, I loved providing care to those that needed the most care […]
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